water management

Lima made headlines this year when it announced it was restoring pre-Incan canals high in the Andes to address its water shortage. That, however, is just one small part of a nationwide shift towards “green infrastructure” that blends the natural ecosystem of the high Andes with man-...

Restoring a pre-Inca network of channels to ensure a steady flow of water from the mountains should help Lima meet some of its growing needs

In the mountains above the Peruvian capital Lima, the world’s second largest desert city, scientists are working with...

This publication represents a collaborative approach, just as the response to mitigate climate change must be. For the first time, the world’s leading economic newspapers and global experts from the public and the private sectors are brought together to present the most promising innovations that make cities more sustainable, and to illustrate how stakeholders can better work together to reach...
EUROPEAN POLICY BRIEF
 
This policy brief summarises the findings of the MEMOLA project with regard to the impact of European water policy on the water cultural heritage associated with historical irrigation systems. The brief also presents...

A new study finds that as greenhouse gas emissions and global temperatures continue to rise, mountain snowmelt will decrease.

Scientists like to think of mountain snowpack as a piggy bank that stores water for not-so-rainy days.

In California, for...

A unique system for tapping underground water sources was developed in the drainage of the Rio Grande de Nasca in Pre-Columbian times. This technique involved the excavation of horizontal trenches and tunnels to reach subterranean aquifers that hold water deep beneath the ground. Still in use today by the inhabitants of the valley, these tunnels, wells and trenches are known collectively as...
The critical importance of water is undeniable. It is particularly vital in semitropical regions with noticeable wet and dry seasons, such as the southern Maya lowlands. Not enough rain results in decreasing water supply and quality, failed crops, and famine. Too much water results in flooding, destruction, poor water quality, and famine. We show not only how Classic Maya (ca. A.D. 250–950)...

FAO LAND AND WATER BULLETIN 8

The processes of land erosion in various regions of Latin America and Africa have their origin in social, economic and cultural factors that translate into the over-exploitation of the natural resources and the application of inadequate...

The principle objective behind UNESCO’s International Hydrological Programme (IHP) has always been to develop a solid scientific and technological base for a sound management of water resources. Both aspects of quantity and quality of water resources are being addressed in the...

This book is about the power of water as much as about the power of water ontologies and water identities, and about the power of the Water Lords’ policy and expert communities, those who are legitimized and endorsed to define and construct ‘the others’ and their problems. Naming and norming, and the legally or scientifically awarded faculty to put water things and users in their place, are basic...

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